Decade of work pays off

Since he was a graduate student, Washington University in St. Louis systems engineer Jr-Shin Li has provided specific mathematical information to experimentalists and clinicians who need it to perform high-resolution magnetic resonance applications, such as body MRIs for medical diagnosis or spectroscopy for uncovering protein structures. Now, after more than a decade of work, he has developed a formula that researchers can use to generate that information themselves.

Li, the Das Family Career Development Distinguished Associate Professor in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and his collaborators have derived a mathematical formula to design broadband pulse sequences to excite a population of nuclear spins over a wide band of frequencies. Such a broadband excitation leads to enhanced signal or sensitivity in diverse quantum experiments across fields from protein spectroscopy to quantum optics.

The research, the first to find that designing the pulse can be done analytically, was published in Nature Communications Sept. 5.

Read Full Article