Carter appointed vice chancellor for innovation, chief commercialization officer

Dedric Carter, vice chancellor for operations and technology transfer, has been appointed as Washington University in St. Louis’ first vice chancellor for innovation and chief commercialization officer (CCO). The appointment is effective Aug. 1, according to Chancellor Andrew D. Martin, PhD, and David H. Perlmutter, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine.

Dedric Carter, Washington University in St. Louis’ first vice chancellor for innovation and chief commercialization officer (CCO)

In his new role, Carter will provide vision and strategy to advance the culture of innovation across the university, strengthen intellectual property assets for licensing, and identify new ventures and opportunities in the entrepreneurial ecosystem. He will engage with internal and external partners to build and grow the innovation activities in all departments and schools. 

“Our goal is to elevate the entrepreneurial impact of the university on the economy of the region and beyond,” Martin said. “As CCO, Dedric will have oversight of the Office of Technology Management in addition to many of our existing entrepreneurial programs. We are fortunate to have a leader of his caliber to step into this critical role for the university.”

“There has been wonderful growth in entrepreneurial activities at the university over the last seven years, and in this new role Dedric will be leading our effort to create even greater impact through the commercialization of the intellectual accomplishments of the university,” Perlmutter said. “Dedric will be reporting to me in my capacity as executive vice chancellor, with the goal of developing portfolios in all of the schools. We have already been able to provide significant additional funding for the work of the Office of Technology Management for education and training in entrepreneurship, increasing networking and new partnerships with key stakeholders and industry collaborators, as well as increased capacity for licensing and patenting.”

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